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Traditional Towels

Traditional Towels

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  1. "Ajiro" Lead Gray【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Ajiro" (wickerwork) pattern
    As named so, the pattern uses a fishing tool as motif that was used instead of a fishing net to catch fish in the river.
    The name comes from woven barks of Japanese cedar, Japanese cypress, and bamboo used to catch fish in place of a fishing net.
    The pattern features characteristic alternating rectangular shapes oriented diagonally left and right. The uniquely three-dimensional shape is due to the hand-made nature of the motif.
    One unique aspect is that the shape can vary greatly depending on the material. The angles in which the materials are woven are more often irregular (not right), making for a unique shape.
    The pattern is used not only for kimonos, but also for house ceilings, folding screens, and more traditional items like Noh costumes from the Edo period.
    Ajiro (wickerwork) made with Japanese cedar bark is called, "Higaki." The pattern is identical.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Lead Gray (Namari-iro)
    Namari-iro, literally meaning lead color, refers to a gray color, with a tinge of blue. One can see when it is melted, that lead actually has a shiny, metallic color, but the surface oxidation, gives it the dark, gray color that we associate with it.
    The name has been in use after the Meiji-era (1912 onwards), and is often used in association with a melancholic, heavy mood. It is also sometimes used to describe a cloudy day, ie. 'Namari-iro no Sora.'

    Color Image

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  2. "Ajiro" Milori Blue【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Ajiro" (wickerwork) pattern
    As named so, the pattern uses a fishing tool as motif that was used instead of a fishing net to catch fish in the river.
    The name comes from woven barks of Japanese cedar, Japanese cypress, and bamboo used to catch fish in place of a fishing net.
    The pattern features characteristic alternating rectangular shapes oriented diagonally left and right. The uniquely three-dimensional shape is due to the hand-made nature of the motif.
    One unique aspect is that the shape can vary greatly depending on the material. The angles in which the materials are woven are more often irregular (not right), making for a unique shape.
    The pattern is used not only for kimonos, but also for house ceilings, folding screens, and more traditional items like Noh costumes from the Edo period.
    Ajiro (wickerwork) made with Japanese cedar bark is called, "Higaki." The pattern is identical.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Milori Blue (Konjo)
    Konjo-iro (Milori blue color) uses azurite, the same mineral pigment as ultramarine blue. When added, azurite's somewhat dark gradient violet color makes for a luxurious blue hue.
    The Milori blue color of azurite has been used since the Heian period, during which it was also called, "Iwagunjo".
    Later, the Milori blue color is found in Europe by chance.

    Color Image
    "Randoko (Azurite)" January 27th, 2016 08:26 (UTC) [Wikipedia Japanese Edition]
    https://ja.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=%E8%97%8D%E9%8A%85%E9%89%B1&oldid=57350631

    Learn More
  3. "Ajiro" Scarlet【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Ajiro" (wickerwork) pattern
    As named so, the pattern uses a fishing tool as motif that was used instead of a fishing net to catch fish in the river.
    The name comes from woven barks of Japanese cedar, Japanese cypress, and bamboo used to catch fish in place of a fishing net.
    The pattern features characteristic alternating rectangular shapes oriented diagonally left and right. The uniquely three-dimensional shape is due to the hand-made nature of the motif.
    One unique aspect is that the shape can vary greatly depending on the material. The angles in which the materials are woven are more often irregular (not right), making for a unique shape.
    The pattern is used not only for kimonos, but also for house ceilings, folding screens, and more traditional items like Noh costumes from the Edo period.
    Ajiro (wickerwork) made with Japanese cedar bark is called, "Higaki." The pattern is identical.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Scarlet (Shojohi)
    Shojohi refers to a red color with an especially strong tinge of yellow. Since the latter Muromachi era, this color was commonly found in woolen clothes imported from Europe.
    Shojo is a mythical creature from China, which resembles a human, but has the body of a dog and the voice of an infant. It is said to understand the language of humans, likes to drink alcohol and is revered as a holy creature.
    Its blood is said to be a bright red and hence the color was named after it.
    The actual source of the dye is believed to have been species of cochineal insects.
    Perhaps out admiration for rare imported goods, in the latter years of the Japanese Civil War Era (16th - 17th centuries), war lords would have their battle surcoats dyed in this color. These are known as Shojohi haori.

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  4. "Arabesque (large)" Brown Dusk【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Arabesque" ("Karakusa")
    A pattern mimicking the design of vines or creepers stretching out.
    Originating from ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia.
    Said to be introduced to Japan via the Silk Road during the Kofun Period.
    A vine that is continually climbing.
    This pattern represents infinite possibilities.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Brown Dusk (Kenpo-iro / Naotsuna Color)
    Between 1603 and 1691 Yoshioka Naotsuna is said to have made this deep brown color popular.
    Used far and wide as a dark color for everyday clothes.
    Known in English as Brown Dusk.

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  5. "Arabesque (large)" Carrot Orange【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Arabesque" ("Karakusa")
    A pattern mimicking the design of vines or creepers stretching out.
    Originating from ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia.
    Said to be introduced to Japan via the Silk Road during the Kofun Period.
    A vine that is continually climbing.
    This pattern represents infinite possibilities.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Carrot Orange (Sohi)
    This is a red-range color derived from madder and lye.
    In China, the name of the color changes based on the number of times the fabric is dyed.
    The traditional Japanese color that is known as Sohi is of a slightly lighter hue than the color of the same name found in China.
    In English it is known as carrot orange.

    Learn More
  6. "Arabesque (large)" Rouge【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Arabesque" ("Karakusa")
    A pattern mimicking the design of vines or creepers stretching out.
    Originating from ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia.
    Said to be introduced to Japan via the Silk Road during the Kofun Period.
    A vine that is continually climbing.
    This pattern represents infinite possibilities.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Rouge (Enji-iro)
    Enji refers to a dark red color, which is slightly darker than the natural dye that it is derived from.
    This name for the color has been in common use since the middle of the Meiji-era (1868-1912).
    To this day, the dye for this color is derived from natural sources, such as cochineal insects, and is widely used in kimono.

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  7. "Arabesque (small)" Light Sappanwood【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Arabesque" ("Karakusa")
    A pattern mimicking the design of vines or creepers stretching out.
    Originating from ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia.
    Said to be introduced to Japan via the Silk Road during the Kofun Period.
    A vine that is continually climbing.
    This pattern represents infinite possibilities.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Light sappanwood (Usu Suo)
    Sappanwood is tree of the pea family that grows in southern countries like India.
    Expresses the color of a lightened version of the violet red dye made from that tree.

    Color Image

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  8. "Arabesque (small)" Pale Ultramarine【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Arabesque" ("Karakusa")
    A pattern mimicking the design of vines or creepers stretching out.
    Originating from ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia.
    Said to be introduced to Japan via the Silk Road during the Kofun Period.
    A vine that is continually climbing.
    This pattern represents infinite possibilities.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Pale Ultramarine (Usu Gunjo)
    This color is a pale, bright blue with a touch of purple.

    Learn More
  9. "Arabesque (small)" Turmeric Yellow【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Arabesque" ("Karakusa")
    A pattern mimicking the design of vines or creepers stretching out.
    Originating from ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia.
    Said to be introduced to Japan via the Silk Road during the Kofun Period.
    A vine that is continually climbing.
    This pattern represents infinite possibilities.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Turmeric Yellow (Ukon)
    It is the deep orange-yellow color that the result of being dyed with the turmeric plant's root.
    The Chinese character "u" in the word "ukon" has the meaning of grass and trees growing lushly, densely.
    From the meaning of growing luxuriantly, it has become to gain the meaning of money, funds increasing.
    It came to be used in the dyeing of purses and wrapping cloths for good luck.

    Color Image

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  10. "Arrow feather" Deep Blue【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.20

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"

    ≪ Design ≫

    "Arrow feather" ("Yagasuri")
    This design takes an arrow as its motif.
    It is composed of a nock receiving a bowstring, the fletching which allows the arrow to fly true, the shaft which is the body of the arrow, and the arrowhead which penetrates the target.
    The use of the arrow design signifies respect for the martial arts.
    And yet, from there stems the interest in the shape, and its use as a design.
    Also, the fletched pattern found in the likes of the ceremonial "hamaya" arrow wards against evil and so means that it is bears significance as a talisman.

    ≪ Color ≫

    Deep Blue (Kon-iro)
    Dark even among indigo dyes. It is a blue which contains a redness that makes it almost indistinguishable from black.
    Japan established the system of courtly rank indicated by headgear color - the seven color, thirteen rank - system in C.E.647. With two ranks for every colour, the system allowed appraisal of rank with a single glance. This deep blue was used as the fifth from top color.

    Color Image

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