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"Shippou" Dusky Purple【Hand-dyed Tenugui】

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    "Shippou" Dusky Purple【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.56

    Availability: In stock

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"


    ≪ Design ≫

    "Shippou"
    The Buddhist term "Shippou" refers to the 7 precious materials (gold/silver/lapis lazuli/quartz/coral/agate/giant clam).
    This circle has a meaning of eternal bonds and amplification, and it is intertwined with a design representing harmony and auspicious omens.


    ≪ Color ≫

    Dusky Purple (Nasukon)
    Usually this color refers to a deep blue color with a purple tinge, like that of an eggplant (nasu). It may seem like a color name with a long history, but its roots can be traced back to the Taisho-era (1912-1926). This color is found in many places.
    The English name for this color is quite literally eggplant.

    Description

    Details

    "Shippou"
    The Buddhist term "Shippou" refers to the 7 precious materials (gold/silver/lapis lazuli/quartz/coral/agate/giant clam).
    They are used to solemnly represent the beauty of Amitabha's Pure Land.

    The seven treasures as written in Buddhist scriptures
    refer to gold, silver, lapis lazuli (a blue stone), coral, agate (emerald), quartz (crystal), and giant clam (a beautiful shell), it is thought.
    This circle has a meaning of eternal bonds and amplification, and it is intertwined with a design representing harmony and auspicious omens.

    To begin with, in Buddhism 7 and 3 are "auspicous numbers" (numbers that call upon good fortune). These treasures are believed to bring spiritual power to oneself and protect one from calamities. eThe numbers 3 and 7 are deeply related to the Buddhist memorial traditions held 7 days after death, 49 days after death, and 2 years after death (the 3rd time the day passes).

    The origin of shippou is said to be in Egypt; in the Chinese Han era, and the Japanese Nara era, the deceased also were buried with shippou among their possessions.
    As it happens, there is a traditional Japanese craft making technique called shippou-ware, but this word is derived from the practice of "making pottery that is as beautiful as shippou."

    http://www.houseki-mall.com/index.html reference: precious stone jewelry mall

    Additional Information

    Additional Information

    Country of Manufacture Japan
    material 100% cotton 30 count yarn used
    weight Approx. 35g
    washing When washing use a mild detergent.
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