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"Kumikikko" Scarlet Fading【Hand-dyed Tenugui】

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    "Kumikikko" Scarlet Fading【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.56

    Availability: In stock

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"


    ≪ Design ≫

    "Kumikikko"
    Pattern with hexagons.
    Just like the shell of a turtle, the pattern consists of perfectly aligned regular hexagons.
    Pattern made with these hexagons is called, Kumikikko.
    The pattern originated in West Asia. It was then passed on to China and Korea, before it reached Japan. Known to be a symbol of good luck in China, the pattern was passed on to Japan.
    The Japanese came to call the haxagon a turtle shell, due to their similar shape.
    From olden days, the pattern has been popularly used in traditional Japanese handicraft.
    From ancient times, people have been saying that, "cranes live a thousand years and turtles live ten thousand years," believing the two animals to be symbols of long-living. Is this true at all? Well, it's more about how the two animals are auspicious symbols of long-life. Shaped after a turtle's carapace and as a symbol of good luck, Kumikikko pattern has been popular in kimono patterns and more.


    ≪ Color ≫

    Scarlet Fading (Hizame-iro)
    Refers to faded scarlet color.
    From ancient times, the color red was also known to ward of evil spirits. This is why red was used.
    Somewhat pink color widely used as people believed that the color red, no matter how bright or dark, would ward off evil.

    Description

    Details

    "Kumikikko"
    Pattern with hexagons.
    Just like the shell of a turtle, the pattern consists of perfectly aligned regular hexagons.
    Pattern made with these hexagons is called, Kumikikko.
    The pattern originated in West Asia. It was then passed on to China and Korea, before it reached Japan. Known to be a symbol of good luck in China, the pattern was passed on to Japan.
    The Japanese came to call the haxagon a turtle shell, due to their similar shape.
    From olden days, the pattern has been popularly used in traditional Japanese handicraft.
    From ancient times, people have been saying that, "cranes live a thousand years and turtles live ten thousand years," believing the two animals to be symbols of long-living. Is this true at all? Well, it's more about how the two animals are auspicious symbols of long-life. Shaped after a turtle's carapace and as a symbol of good luck, Kumikikko pattern has been popular in kimono patterns and more.

    Additional Information

    Additional Information

    Country of Manufacture Japan
    material 100% cotton 30 count yarn used
    weight Approx. 35g
    washing When washing use a mild detergent.
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