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"Ichimatsu Lattice" Scarlet【Hand-dyed Tenugui】

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    "Ichimatsu Lattice" Scarlet【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.56

    Availability: In stock

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"


    ≪ Design ≫

    "Ichimatsu Lattice"
    A grid pattern with different colors.
    The Edo-era kabuki actor, Ichimatsu Sanogawa, used this pattern in the hakama he wore in theatrical costumes, so checked patterns came to be called Ichimatsu patterns.
    In English, this pattern is commonly called a “checker” pattern.


    ≪ Color ≫

    Scarlet (Benihi)
    'Beni' is the Japanese name for a bright red color, that is derived from a safflower plant, a member of the daisy family.
    'Hi,' or scarlet, is a bright red, with a tinge of yellow and has been in use since the Heian Era (9th - 12th century). This was a very noble color, second to purple, and was worn by high ranking government officials of the era.
    'Benihi' is a color that is a combination of the two colors, 'beni' and 'hi.' It is best described as a glossy vermilion color.

    Description

    Details

    "Ichimatsu Lattice"
    A grid pattern with different colors.The Edo-era kabuki actor, Ichimatsu Sanogawa, used this pattern in the hakama he wore in theatrical costumes, so checked patterns came to be called Ichimatsu patterns.
    The Ichimatsu pattern was also seen on garments on haniwa pottery of the Tumulus historical period, as well as woven goods from Horyuji and Soshoin. and existed as a weaving pattern since before ancient times. In usages by the Imperial Court, the pattern was customarily called ishidatami (stone paving) or arare (hail). For that reason, the patterns that existed before the Edo era was called ishidatami. The middle Edo period kabuki actor, Ichimatsu Sanogawa the First, wore a hakama with a differently-colored ishidatami pattern when he achieved popularity with his role playing the noble page Kumenosuke in “Konoyama Lovers’ Suicide.” Subsequently, ishidatami patterns became known as Ichimatsu patterns. After that, Ichimatsu Sanogawa switched to female roles, and became a top young actor in Edo playing women. With his good looks、he was often rendered in ukiyo-e paintings, and Ichimatsu patterns also became fashionable as a design for kimonos.
    In English, this pattern is commonly called a “checker” pattern.

    Additional Information

    Additional Information

    Country of Manufacture Japan
    material 100% cotton 30 count yarn used
    weight Approx. 35g
    washing When washing use a mild detergent.
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