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"Nakamura" Deep Pale Blue【Hand-dyed Tenugui】

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    "Nakamura" Deep Pale Blue【Hand-dyed Tenugui】
    $16.56

    Availability: In stock

    This japanese towel is dyed using traditional hand dyeing techniques unique to Japan called "Chusen".The back side is the same design.The back side is not white.You can use it without worrying about the front and back.
    »About "Chusen"


    ≪ Design ≫

    "Nakamura"
    This pattern is called “Nakamura Gōshi.”
    Patterns that used writing in this way were popular in the world of Kabuki during the Edo period, around 1800 CE. As a normal pattern would be dull, Kabuki actors thought of designs that contained puns on their own stage names and made yukata out of them. They are appealing designs that are still in use today. Not just the“Nakamura Gōshi,” but also designs like the “Kamawanu”.
    This design was the pattern used by Kanzaburō Nakamura, and uses the Japanese characters for “naka” (中) and “ra” (ら). The place where the six lines are used represents the character for “mu” (六), as the number of lines in the pattern is similar to the character.
    This spot where the “naka” and “ra” characters are not facing the same direction is considered an aspect of the design.


    ≪ Color ≫

    Deep Pale Blue (Hanada-iro)
    Originally, this term referred to a color made using the liquid of pressed dayflower petals as a dyeing agent, but this blue faded extremely easily and would disappear on contact with water, so it was commonly used to indicate a color made with the far more durable indigo plant, and appears to have been used long ago as a general name for colors in the common blue family. However, the commelina communis var. hortensis, a cultivated variety of the tsuyukusa (Asiatic dayflower), is still used in textile design crafts like Yuzen dyeing.

    “Hanada” January 15, 2016 05:55 (UTC) “Wikipedia Japanese Version” https://ja.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=%E7%B8%B9&oldid=39655531

    Description

    Details

    "Nakamura"
    This pattern is called “Nakamura Gōshi.”
    Patterns that used writing in this way were popular in the world of Kabuki during the Edo period, around 1800 CE.
    As a normal pattern would be dull, Kabuki actors thought of designs that contained puns on their own stage names and made yukata out of them. It appears that city dwellers too would wear a yukata of the same pattern as their favorite actor to go see Kabuki performances. Besides the Nakamura pattern, late Edo period Kabuki actor Uzaemon Ichimura XII wore a pattern called Ichimura Gōshi.
    “Harimaya Gōshi” is the gōshi used by Kichiemon Nakamura, whose stage name was Harimaya...
    There are many other patterns made with Kabuki actors’ puns of their stage names, like “Shikanjima,” “Kōrai Gōshi,” and “Rokuyata Gōshi.”
    In this way, many designs came out of the late Edo period.
    They are appealing designs that are still in use today. Not just the“Nakamura Gōshi,” but also designs like the “Kamawanu”.
    This design was the pattern used by Kanzaburō Nakamura, and uses the Japanese characters for “naka” (中) and “ra” (ら). The place where the six lines are used represents the character for “mu” (六), as the number of lines in the pattern is similar to the character.
    This spot where the “naka” and “ra” characters are not facing the same direction is considered an aspect of the design.

    Additional Information

    Additional Information

    Country of Manufacture Japan
    material 100% cotton 30 count yarn used
    weight Approx. 35g
    washing When washing use a mild detergent.
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